CONTRIBUTORS

Dien Nguyen An Luong

Mr Dien Nguyen An Luong is a Visiting Fellow with the Media, Technology and Society Programme of the ISEAS – Yusof Ishak Institute. A journalist with significant experience as managing editor at Vietnam’s top newsrooms, his work has also appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Guardian, South China Morning Post, and other publications. 

Articles by Dien Nguyen An Luong (11)

Vietnam’s High Vaccination Rates: So What?

Dien Nguyen An Luong

The Vietnamese government can rightly be proud of the great strides made in its vaccine rollout, but needs to do better in addressing the economic fallout of the pandemic.

Restoring Public Trust in Vietnam’s Pandemic Response: A Bumpy Road Ahead

Dien Nguyen An Luong

The worst wave of Covid-19 infections to hit Vietnam since late April has threatened to chip away at the hard-earned public trust the government was able to engender last year. That is a major concern for a regime that relies on public support and patriotic nationalism to boost its legitimacy.

In Vietnam, the Afghanistan Spectre Fails to Haunt a Pro-America Audience Online

Dien Nguyen An Luong

Many observers have drawn parallels between the U.S.’ chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan and memories of the “Fall of Saigon”. But Vietnamese reactions to U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris’ recent visit there shows continued favourable sentiments towards the U.S.

Comparing Vietnamese Responses to Chinese and American Public Diplomacy Efforts on Social Media

Dien Nguyen An Luong

In this study, the Facebook posts by the Chinese embassy and consulate in Vietnam were compared with those of the U.S. embassy and consulate over seven months. The findings show that China’s public diplomacy efforts in Vietnam tend to peddle anti-America narratives. But by and large, the Vietnamese public appears more receptive to the U.S. narratives.

Placate the Young and Control Online Discourse: The Vietnamese State’s Tightrope

Dien Nguyen An Luong

A key challenge for Vietnam is to control cyberspace without alienating growing numbers of Internet-savvy youths. Unlike China, Vietnam has not been able to muster enough political and technological resources to craft sophisticated campaigns to boost youth nationalism. The gap is even more pronounced online.