CONTRIBUTORS

Aristyo Rizka Darmawan

Aristyo Rizka Darmawan

Aristyo Rizka Darmawan is a Lecturer in International Law at the University of Indonesia and Young Leader at the Honolulu-based Pacific Forum Foreign Policy Research Institute. His research focuses on international law and foreign policy in the Asia Pacific. He holds a Master’s in international law from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University.

His articles on the South China Sea and the law of the sea have appeared in international outlets, such as the Lowy Institute the Interpreter, Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative CSIS, East Asia Forum (Australian National University), Policy Forum (Australian National University), Asia Global Online (Hongkong University), Fletcher Forum of World Affairs, Mongabay, the Jakarta Post, and Bangkok Post.

Articles by Aristyo Rizka Darmawan (5)

Why the New Indonesia-US Maritime Training Centre is Strategically Important

Aristyo Rizka Darmawan

A new maritime training centre established by Indonesia and the United States is emblematic of sustained bilateral cooperation in the maritime domain, and the ASEAN member state’s independent and active foreign policy.

China and Indonesia: The Limits of Transactionalism

Aristyo Rizka Darmawan

Indonesia’s transactional approach in its relations with China has its merits. But there are limits, given the need for Jakarta to maintain relationships with other regional powers.

International Law Matters in the South China Sea

Aristyo Rizka Darmawan

China is trying to rewrite international law in the South China Sea.

USS John S. McCain

The USA and UNCLOS: Time to Ratify

Aristyo Rizka Darmawan

Actions speak louder than words. Ratifying UNCLOS would strengthen the US’ stabilising role in the Indo-Pacific.

China’s New Coast Guard Law: Illegal and Escalatory

Aristyo Rizka Darmawan

A new Chinese law, which gives its coast guard legal cover to fire on foreign vessels in contested waters, is worrying. States interested in the peace and stability of the South China Sea should do something about it.